Education in America: The Views of Millennials

Education in America: The Views of Millennials

Nearly half of millennials give the nation's public schools a grade of "C," while roughly three-quarters agree that students from low-income families receive an inferior education than those from wealthy families, a report from the GenForward project at the University of Chicago finds. Based on a survey of more than eighteen hundred millennials between the ages of 18 and 34, the report, Education in America: The Views of Millennials (41 pages, PDF), found that millennials differ on the role race plays in the quality of education in America, with 59 percent of African-American and 56 percent of Asian-American respondents saying students of color received a worse education, compared with 43 percent of white and 39 percent of Latina/o respondents. When asked why black and Latina/o students are suspended at disproportionately higher rates than white or Asian-American students, African Americans (34 percent) were most likely to say that teachers and administrators were insensitive to the issues those students face, while Asian Americans (35 percent), Latino/a (39 percent), and whites (40 percent) were most likely to say that those students tend to attend schools with limited resources that must rely on strict discipline. Supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the survey also found that Asian-American (62 percent) and Latino/a (57 percent) respondents were more likely than African-American (45 percent) or white (44 percent) respondents to believe that a college education is necessary to succeed in the twenty-first century economy.